“Rebecca sings with feeling and soul – and always with fantastic intonation. Her take on these songs, from the interesting and beautifully conceived instrumentation that surrounds her to her wonderful interpretation of them is fresh and exciting.”
– Pat Metheny

“Rebecca Martin is a delight. I was first introduced to her music through ‘Once Blue’ and ‘Thoroughfare’. With ‘Middlehope,’ she boldly continues to expand her concept and musical territories.”
– Charles Lloyd

“As jazz singers go, Rebecca Martin exudes the plainest sort of poise, almost radical in its utter lack of flash. When she wasn’t cradling an acoustic guitar on Thursday night at the Cornelia Street Café, she held her arms clasped behind her back, as if to make sure they wouldn’t be a distraction. She sang quietly, favoring slow tempos.  Her embellishments registered on the granular level, in the placement of a phrase or a light catch in her throat. She was unerringly faithful to the melodies of the songs, both standards and originals…she made them seem less like songs than like articulations of her state of mind.”
– Nate ChinenThe New York Times

“Rebecca Martin, with a voice as intelligent as Joni Mitchell though different in timbre….her firmness of a woman sure of her music….our enthusiasm for renewing the musical tradition is at its height here.”
– Michel Contat, Telerama (France)

“We cannot overstate the importance of sincerity, as with Rebecca Martin, it is built entirely in art. Her voice is that of the love and confidence of maternal comfort.”
Michel Contat, Telerama (France)

“I’ve been mildly obsessed with the jazz singer Rebecca Martin for a hot minute.”
Patrick Jarenwattananon, NPR

“Rebecca Martin’s “When I Was Long Ago” (Sunnyside) is one of the most exceptional jazz vocal recordings of the year.”
Martin Johnson, Wall Street Journal

“Rebecca Martin’s “When I Was Long Ago” (Sunnyside) is one of the most exceptional jazz vocal recordings of the year.”
Nate Chinen, The New York Times

“The jazz singer Rebecca Martin can sing slow swing with a supreme sense of centering around the pulse, re-designing melodies and making her voice crinkle at emotional points. And when the drumming goes away completely, she grows stronger…the musicians give her molasses swing and empathy and lots of empty space, and she takes care of the rest.”
Ben Ratliff,  The New York Times

“In the circles of Jazz in New York, the singer (Rebecca Martin) has had critical success. Her approval rating has risen steadily over recent years, and for good reason. In Montreal, however, she still remains a secret … I will not keep it to myself.  Count me in!”
Alain Brunet, La Presse (Canada)

“Martin writes of places where broken hearts and shattered dreams threaten a better life that nonetheless seems to be still, perhaps just barely, within our reach. Sometimes the imagery and metaphors thicken, but the lovely melodies always carry hints of a way to where disillusionment cannot rule. The sound of Martin’s music offers a comfort. But it’s an uneasy one that’s complicated by an artist’s open eyes and ears and a writer’s knowledge that “words are ruthless,” although there can also be found “a garden in an inkwell.””
Steve Feeney, Portland Press Herald

“Rebecca Martin is a quintessential American artist, a balladeer in the purest sense, a necessary and honest “shaper.”
– Cathie PelletierWriter

“…Noone mentioned Rebecca was a singer. They didn’t have to. It wasn’t just the soft lilt of her voice, but the way she held onto words for an extra beat and then let them tumble out in a rush of soft exclamations. Even if she were in the background, it was hard not to see her as being center stage….the confines of a band, even a casual one, was out of character for Rebecca, just as it would be out of character for Georgia O’Keefe, Amelia Earhart or Joni Mitchell. She moved out of the band the way you’d move out of an apartment that was too small or too noisy…’ll anchored by Rebecca’s elegant songs, lovely, picked guitar and smokey, generous voice. It’s a voice that seems to leave nothing out; sex and death and breakfast and wind in the trees and tax forms and laughter and night. All at once.”
– Brian CullmanWriter